Reckoning Maui

CRISIS, REDEMPTION AND CEREMONY WHEN THE ROUGH GODS COME ROUND

NOVEMBER 10–12, 2023  |   HAʻIKŪ, MAUI

Dear Friends,

There’s a small altar in my kitchen. An ever changing collection of shells, cards, stones, flowers, crafted arts, and candles. For more than a year, in the mix of it all, is a handwritten note folded just so and placed in a ceramic dish. I can’t recall the exact words now, as many days filled with wonder and sorrow have passed by. But, I remember why it was written. 

A petition to my old ones, to the gods of this land, to mystery. 

Maui, like much of Hawaiʻi, has become a playground for the leisurely inclined, third home, winter home destination, a distraction from regular life where anything is possible, everything is available, and anything goes. 

Outsiders continue to move here only to invent some tourist based business acting as the pimp and prostituting out the beauty of the land. 

And we imagine all these acts are justifiable simply because we feel good, because the river told us we were needed, because the tendency to let ourselves off the hook of consequences is disguised in the “live your best life” lingo. 

Into this scenario walks a wind storm in August ripping fires throughout Maui. A wreckage still smoldering now.

Before grief could really settle in to hold the community, the opinions, the shaming and the conspiracies took over. Old wounds, unhealed wounds, questions of belonging, questions of purpose all rising to the surface. Who has been lost? What has been lost? Here. 

Reckoning Maui is the handwritten petition from the kitchen altar coming into form, in real time, to the old ones, land, and mystery of this place and the people who call it home. A worthwhile dream, a life line in a whirl of confusion.

There is no audience at a Reckoning event. Not that we are all the same and I don’t mean to give the impression there is no direction. Simply, with Stephen Jenkinson and Kimberly Ann Johnson at the front of the room, the conversation holds a willingness to take on the hard and tangled questions of these days.

Over the last handful of years, once solid friendships have all but disintegrated with my inclination to linger over the effect of visitors to the island. So it is no small thing that I have asked Stephen Jenkinson and Kimberly Ann Johson to come here. There is weight involved. There are the Haiku Sessions that Stephen and Bodhi Be produced some years back lending something of a past for us to lean on. 

It is the quiet stories and glazed look of folks either frozen in shock or fixated on everything will be better in the future. It is a confession of a friend who realized all the tools they thought made them a good person, turns out are mostly useless in a real crisis. These are what has me stirred and willing to invite Stephen Jenkinson and Kimberly Ann Jonhson here, now. 

Reckoning Maui is a Love Letter from me to you, my neighbors, my community, the Maui ʻohana.  An invitation to be gathered in by a longing to belong, to practice etiquette where it is lost, to wonder about the consequences of these times. I’m not suggesting this is a solution, rather a way that we might be broken hearted, together. 


Mahalo a Nui Loa
A Grand Thanks
~Khadija Meghan Rashell Striegel
Host of Reckoning Maui

We have to make up our minds about what kind of a time we're in, and we have to do it soon.

Business as usual, with the odd torque in weather and fortune? Do we adjust, course correct, move on?
Eke out our personal victories?

Or has critical mass trouble come, and the old sign’s now changed, and it reads: Be prepared to be stopped?

Are we now – yet? – officially citizens of a troubled time? Is this affliction?
Is this an assignment?

In twenty short years, how will we be remembered?
What did we do when the signs were sent?

A crisis is when you decide the time has come, and you opt into limits. Not more believing. More learning.

A crisis is where you decide if there are just more personal holy lands now, more no-go zones, more untouchables.

A crisis isn't a feeling.
It's a place, a crossroads.

It's where you
wise up.
It's where you do the aftermath.

A crisis is a time for reckoning. That's what a ceremony of learning is: a figuring of the (un)likelies, a choreography for wisdom sorrow.

Listen to Khadija & Kimberly Here

The Details

In-Person Gathering

Sessions

November 10th Friday 5:30-9pm
November 11th Saturday 9-12:30pm and 5:30-9pm
November 12th Sunday 9-12:30pm

gates open at 8:30am for morning sessions, and at 5:30pm for evening sessions

Location will be provided to those with tickets close to the event.

Accommodation & food is self-organized.

Join Reckoning Maui with Stephen Jenkinson and Kimberly Ann Johnson

Hawai’i ‘ohana : $200
Off-Island : $400

CREDIT CARD PAYMENTS

To pay via PayPal or Cash, contact Khadija:
khadija@familytraditions
maui.com
(no Maui ‘ohana will be turned away for lack of funds)

Want to contribute to the event?
Send your donation to Khadija via Paypal (@khadijamaui) with the note “Maui Reckoning Donation”.

Want to send herbs and materials to Khadija directly to support the Maui ‘ohana in this time?
Find a letter and list of resources HERE.

CASH / CHECK

email Khadija: khadija@familytraditions maui.com
(for address or to meet up)

Questions?

Contact khadija@familytraditions
maui.com

About Stephen Jenkinson:

Stephen is a worker, author, storyteller, culture activist, and co-founder of the Orphan Wisdom School with his wife Nathalie Roy. The school is a teaching house for skills of deep living and making human culture that are mandatory in endangered, endangering times. He makes books, tends farm and mends broken handles and fences, succumbs to interviews, teaches and performs internationally.

He has Master’s degrees from Harvard University (Theology) and the University of Toronto (Social Work). 

Apprenticed to a master storyteller when a young man, he has worked extensively with dying people and their families, is former program director in a major Canadian hospital, former assistant professor in a prominent Canadian medical school.

Stephen Jenkinson is the author of A Generation’s Worth: Spirit Work While the Crisis Reigns (2021), Come of Age: The Case for Elderhood in a Time of Trouble (2018), the award-winning Die Wise: A Manifesto for Sanity and Soul (2015), Homecoming: The Haiku Sessions (a live teaching from 2013), How it All Could Be: A workbook for dying people and those who love them (2009), Angel and Executioner: Grief and the Love of Life – (a live teaching from 2009), and Money and The Soul’s Desires: A Meditation (2002), and Reckoning (2022), co-authored with Kimberly Ann Johnson.

He is also the subject of the feature length documentary film Griefwalker, a portrait of his work with dying people, and Lost Nation Road, a shorter documentary on the crafting of the Nights of Grief and Mystery tours.

About Kimberly Ann Johnson

Kimberly Johnson is an author, postpartum care activist, trauma educator, structural bodyworker and mother. She graduated Valedictorian from Northwestern University with a BS in Social Policy (‘97).

She studied yoga directly with the three main lineage holders of the Krishnamacharya tradition- Desikachar, BKS Iyengar, and Pattabhi Jois and taught yoga full time for 15 years, while also maintaining a Structural Integration practice.

When radically rearranged by childbirth, Kimberly’s life changed shape to attend to the cultural chasm of postpartum care, and as a result she trained in Somatic Experiencing and Sexological Bodywork to be able to help women heal from birth injuries, gynecological surgeries and sexual boundary violations.

She is the author of the recent Call of the Wild: How We Heal Trauma, Awaken Our Own Power and Use it for Good published by the feminist imprint HarperWave as well as the early mothering classic, The Fourth Trimester: A Postpartum Guide to Healing Your Body, Balancing Your Emotions and Restoring Your Vitality (Shambhala, 2017), and Reckoning (2022) co-authored with Stephen Jenkinson.

Hosted by Khadija Striegel

Born and raised on Maui, Khadija is an herbalist, bonesetter and farmer. Sheʻs been working with Stephen Jenkinson after seeing him at an event hosted by Bodhi Be back in 2017, and is fulfilling a dream by bringing Stephen Jenkinson back to the Maui ʻohana, especially now.

Collection of Works by Stephen Jenkinson &
Kimberly Ann Johnson

Reckoning Maui

Crisis, redemption and ceremony when the Rough Gods come round

NOVEMBER 10–12, 2023  |   HAʻIKŪ, MAUI

Dear Friends,

There’s a small altar in my kitchen. An ever changing collection of shells, cards, stones, flowers, crafted arts, and candles. For more than a year, in the mix of it all, is a handwritten note folded just so and placed in a ceramic dish. I can’t recall the exact words now, as many days filled with wonder and sorrow have passed by. But, I remember why it was written. 

A petition to my old ones, to the gods of this land, to mystery. 

Maui, like much of Hawaiʻi, has become a playground for the leisurely inclined, third home, winter home destination, a distraction from regular life where anything is possible, everything is available, and anything goes. 

Outsiders continue to move here only to invent some tourist based business acting as the pimp and prostituting out the beauty of the land. 

And we imagine all these acts are justifiable simply because we feel good, because the river told us we were needed, because the tendency to let ourselves off the hook of consequences is disguised in the “live your best life” lingo. 

Into this scenario walks a wind storm in August ripping fires throughout Maui. A wreckage still smoldering now.

Before grief could really settle in to hold the community, the opinions, the shaming and the conspiracies took over. Old wounds, unhealed wounds, questions of belonging, questions of purpose all rising to the surface. Who has been lost? What has been lost? Here. 

Reckoning Maui is the handwritten petition from the kitchen altar coming into form, in real time, to the old ones, land, and mystery of this place and the people who call it home. A worthwhile dream, a life line in a whirl of confusion.

There is no audience at a Reckoning event. Not that we are all the same and I don’t mean to give the impression there is no direction. Simply, with Stephen Jenkinson and Kimberly Ann Johnson at the front of the room, the conversation holds a willingness to take on the hard and tangled questions of these days.

Over the last handful of years, once solid friendships have all but disintegrated with my inclination to linger over the effect of visitors to the island. So it is no small thing that I have asked Stephen Jenkinson and Kimberly Ann Johson to come here. There is weight involved. There are the Haiku Sessions that Stephen and Bodhi Be produced some years back lending something of a past for us to lean on. 

It is the quiet stories and glazed look of folks either frozen in shock or fixated on everything will be better in the future. It is a confession of a friend who realized all the tools they thought made them a good person, turns out are mostly useless in a real crisis. These are what has me stirred and willing to invite Stephen Jenkinson and Kimberly Ann Jonhson here, now. 

Reckoning Maui is a Love Letter from me to you, my neighbors, my community, the Maui ʻohana.  An invitation to be gathered in by a longing to belong, to practice etiquette where it is lost, to wonder about the consequences of these times. I’m not suggesting this is a solution, rather a way that we might be broken hearted, together. 


Mahalo a Nui Loa
A Grand Thanks
~Khadija Meghan Rashell Striegel
Host of Reckoning Maui

We have to make up our minds about what kind of a time we're in, and we have to do it soon.

Business as usual, with the odd torque in weather and fortune? Do we adjust, course correct, move on?
Eke out our personal victories?

Or has critical mass trouble come, and the old sign’s now changed, and it reads: Be prepared to be stopped?

Are we now – yet? – officially citizens of a troubled time? Is this affliction?
Is this an assignment?

In twenty short years, how will we be remembered?
What did we do when the signs were sent?

A crisis is when you decide the time has come, and you opt into limits. Not more believing. More learning.

A crisis is where you decide if there are just more personal holy lands now, more no-go zones, more untouchables.

A crisis isn't a feeling.
It's a place, a crossroads.

It's where you wise up.
It's where you do the aftermath.

A crisis is a time for reckoning. That's what a ceremony of learning is: a figuring of the (un)likelies, a choreography for wisdom sorrow.

Listen to Khadija + Kimberly Here

The Details

In-Person Gathering

Sessions

November 10th Friday 6-8pm
November 11th Saturday 9am-12pm and 6-9pm
November 12th Sunday 9am-12pm 

gates open at 8:30am for morning sessions, and at 5:30pm for evening sessions

Location will be provided to those with tickets close to the event.

Accommodation & food is self-organized.

Join Reckoning Maui with Stephen Jenkinson and Kimberly Ann Johnson

Hawai’i ‘ohana : $200
Off-Island : $400

CREDIT CARD PAYMENTS

To pay via PayPal or Cash, contact Khadija:
khadija@familytraditionsmaui.com
(no Maui ‘ohana will be turned away for lack of funds)

Want to contribute to the event?
Send your donation to Khadija via Paypal (@khadijamaui) with the note “Reckoning Maui Donation”.

Want to send herbs and materials to Khadija directly to support the Maui ‘ohana in this time?
Find a letter and list of resources HERE.

Questions?

CONTACT KHADIJA@FAMILYTRADITIONSMAUI.COM

CASH / CHECK

email Khadija: khadija@familytraditions maui.com
(for address or to meet up)

About Stephen Jenkinson:

Stephen is a worker, author, storyteller, culture activist, and co-founder of the Orphan Wisdom School with his wife Nathalie Roy. The school is a teaching house for skills of deep living and making human culture that are mandatory in endangered, endangering times. He makes books, tends farm and mends broken handles and fences, succumbs to interviews, teaches and performs internationally.

He has Master’s degrees from Harvard University (Theology) and the University of Toronto (Social Work). 

Apprenticed to a master storyteller when a young man, he has worked extensively with dying people and their families, is former program director in a major Canadian hospital, former assistant professor in a prominent Canadian medical school.

Stephen Jenkinson is the author of A Generation’s Worth: Spirit Work While the Crisis Reigns (2021), Come of Age: The Case for Elderhood in a Time of Trouble (2018), the award-winning Die Wise: A Manifesto for Sanity and Soul (2015), Homecoming: The Haiku Sessions (a live teaching from 2013), How it All Could Be: A workbook for dying people and those who love them (2009), Angel and Executioner: Grief and the Love of Life – (a live teaching from 2009), and Money and The Soul’s Desires: A Meditation (2002), and Reckoning (2022), co-authored with Kimberly Ann Johnson.

He is also the subject of the feature length documentary film Griefwalker, a portrait of his work with dying people, and Lost Nation Road, a shorter documentary on the crafting of the Nights of Grief and Mystery tours.

About Kimberly Ann Johnson

Kimberly Johnson is an author, postpartum care activist, trauma educator, structural bodyworker and mother. She graduated Valedictorian from Northwestern University with a BS in Social Policy (‘97).

She studied yoga directly with the three main lineage holders of the Krishnamacharya tradition- Desikachar, BKS Iyengar, and Pattabhi Jois and taught yoga full time for 15 years, while also maintaining a Structural Integration practice.

When radically rearranged by childbirth, Kimberly’s life changed shape to attend to the cultural chasm of postpartum care, and as a result she trained in Somatic Experiencing and Sexological Bodywork to be able to help women heal from birth injuries, gynecological surgeries and sexual boundary violations.

She is the author of the recent Call of the Wild: How We Heal Trauma, Awaken Our Own Power and Use it for Good published by the feminist imprint HarperWave as well as the early mothering classic, The Fourth Trimester: A Postpartum Guide to Healing Your Body, Balancing Your Emotions and Restoring Your Vitality (Shambhala, 2017), and Reckoning (2022) co-authored with Stephen Jenkinson.

Hosted by Khadija Striegel

Born and raised on Maui, Khadija is an herbalist, bonesetter and farmer. Sheʻs been working with Stephen Jenkinson after seeing him at an event hosted by Bodhi Be back in 2017, and is fulfilling a dream by bringing Stephen Jenkinson back to the Maui ʻohana, especially now.

Collection of works by Stephen Jenkinson & Kimberly Ann Johnson